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Archived: Paddington Medicentre

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 8 November 2013
Date of Publication: 13 December 2013
Inspection Report published 13 December 2013 PDF

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We carried out a visit on 8 November 2013, observed how people were being cared for and talked with staff.

We spoke to one person who used the service.

Our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

Reasons for our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. People had a consultation with the doctor where an initial physical examination could take place and the required procedure was conducted. This could be ear irrigation or a vaccination. Physical examinations were conducted and vaccinations were conducted after attaining verbal consent and we were told that this was recorded in the patient notes. Written consent was required for some procedures which included ear irrigation, acupuncture and exercise testing. People were given a copy of a consent form prior these treatments being conducted and were requested to sign these. If people required more time, they could take the form away with them and arrange an appointment for another time.

People could request a chaperone or bring a chaperone into their appointment and children were required to be accompanied by their parent or guardian at all times. We saw a copy of the provider’s consent policy. This detailed that children and young adults were required to be involved in decisions about their treatment as much as possible.

We spoke with one person who used the service. They told us they felt all explanations of treatments were clear and they felt well informed. This person confirmed that they were asked for their consent before any treatment was given.

We saw that systems were in place for ensuring that consent had been obtained before every procedure. Where consent forms were required, administrative staff ensured the form had been filled in and this was checked by the doctor. All verbal consent was recorded in the person’s notes and clinical notes audits were conducted every six to 12 months to ensure that this happened.